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  • Uganda’s Government Issues Strict Dress Code For Civil Servants

    Public servants in Uganda are facing a strict dress code after the government issued a circular warning them to “dress decently”.

     

    Female staff have been told that dresses or skirts that are above the knees, sleeveless blouses or any clothing made out of see-through material will not be allowed.

     

    Braids and extensions have also been banned.

     

    Men must wear long-sleeved shirts and ties and not brightly-coloured clothes.

     

    The guidelines, issued by the Ministry of Public Service apply to all non-uniformed civil servants. But there is a feeling that female staff are the main focus on the new rules.

     

    While women will be allowed to wear pant-suits, they have been warned not to wear any tight-fitting clothing or show cleavage.

     

    Flat, open shoes are also ruled out, except in cases where one can prove that it is for medical reasons.

     

    The circular is derived from Public Service Standing Orders on dress code, put in place in 2010.

     

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  • China is building first 'forest city' of 40,000 trees to fight air pollution

     

    In the wake of President Trump's decision to remove America from the Paris Climate agreement, you'd be forgiven for feeling a little negative about the future of the planet.

    With reports of huge cracks appearing in the Antarctic ice, fears that preventing the two degree heating of the planet might be a pipe dream, and the world's food supplies at risk - everything looks and sounds grim.

    Fortunately though, there are some good news stories on the horizon; with many of them coming from China. The country has been leading the way when it comes to 'green living' in recent years, with the government announcing it had completed construction of the world's largest floating solar farm. Now, in an attempt to curb the production of toxic gasses, the country is continuing to pave the way (so to speak) with the construction of one of the world's first 'forest cities'.

    Designed by Stefano Boeri, who you might remember also designed two vertical skyscraper 'forests', the city is currently under construction in Liuzhou, Guangxi Province.

    Once completed, the new city will reportedly host 30,000 people and - thanks to the abundance of trees and plants - will absorb almost 10,000 tons of CO2, 57 tons of pollutants per year and produce approximately 900 tons of oxygen annually.

    The city will achieve these rather impressive figures thanks to roughly a million plants from over 100 species, as well as 40,000 trees being planted in facades over almost every surface imaginable.

    The new Liuzhou Forest City will connect to the existing Liuzhou via a series of fast rail services and electric cars; it will also reportedly house a number of schools and two hospitals. There are also plans to make the city self-sustainable with regards to power, thanks to geothermal and solar energy resources.

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  • Man with 176 children seeks govt support

    A 65-year-old man, Mustafa Magambo Mutone, wants the Government to support some of his 176 children. “I have tried to feed my 13 wives and over 170 children and it is not easy. I request the Government to at least sponsor 30 of my children in secondary schools and tertiary institutions,” Mutone, a businessman and a resident of Kyaterekera trading centre in Kagadi district, said.

    He added that he has over 40 children in primary school and has plans to establish his own nursery and primary school in Kyaterekera subcounty. He says he has about 10 children in the universities (Makerere, Mbarara and Kyambogo), most of them on private sponsorship. Mutone has five pairs of twins among his children. His children will hit the 180 mark by the end of the year because six of his wives are pregnant.

    Mutone, a Mubwisi by tribe, is the chairman of Kyaterekera A village. He says he was born on January 1, 1952 in Kiryabwenju, Nyamiti parish, Muhorro town council in Kagadi district. His first marriage was in 1968 at 16 years of age.

    He explained that he is still strong enough to marry more wives and bear more children, since he does not drink alcohol, smoke or take sugar. Mutone, who deals in produce (beans, maize and coffee), also owns a wholesale shop at Kyaterekera trading centre. Mutone said some of his wives are working as midwives at Mulago Hospital and Mbarara Hospital and in Rwanda.

    “Two of my wives who gave birth to twins are in Kampala and Isingiro, working as midwives, while another two — Haniffer Kabasomi and Jane Tuhaise — work as nurses. My youngest wife is 25, and the eldest is 50, but I had about 10 girlfriends before I married officially and they all delivered the same year,” Mutone said.

    He added that his first born child is 49 years old, while the youngest are four-year-old twins. He further noted that he has over 90 grandchildren. The grey-haired Mutone, said he has a special book where he records every child born whether within the country or outside, because he has some wives in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Burundi.

    He said one of the challenges he faces is the long distance as some of his women live in different parts of the country. ‘’I receive about 10 calls every day from different wives who want attention but I cannot be everywhere. I have seven wives in Kagadi alone,” he said. “I do not have any challenge of supporting them because some of them support themselves since they work,” Mutone said.

    Madina Tibasiima, 45, one of his wives who has nine children, said she has not faced any problems with a big family because most of her children are working as soldiers, civil servants and nurses. She, however, said her younger children need school fees; some are in primary school and others in secondary school. One of Mutone’s sons, Kyaise Suwedi, 40, the Gombolola internal security officer of Kyaterekera, said his monthly salary caters for some of his brothers’ education.

    “We were groomed by our father to be responsible, have good morals and work hard. The only challenge is the big number of dependants of other wives who have children aged between four and 13 years,’’ Kyaise said. Muhamad Byarufu, 45, also a son of Mutone, said he owns a business and helps pay school fees of some of his younger brothers.

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  • New AIDS Vaccine ‘Cures’ 5 Patients without Drugs

     

    Three weeks after a Nigerian Professor, Maduike Ezeibe of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture claimed to have discovered a cure for Human Immuno-deficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS), Spanish scientists over the weekend said five patients living with the disease are virus-free seven months after taking a new vaccine.

    According to a study published in New Scientist but first reported by DailyMailUK Online, the treatment, developed by researchers in Spain, allowed the patients to stop taking regular antiretroviral (ARV) drugs – the current method of suppressing HIV.

    Scientists have yet to test the results in a large-scale clinical trial, but they say the vaccine may be a “functional cure.”

    It is the first step towards success in a field that has failed to find a vaccine in the last 30 years.

    Dr. Beatriz Mothe, from the IrsiCaixa AIDS Research Institute in Barcelona, Spain, said: “It’s the proof of concept that through therapeutic vaccination we can re-educate our T cells to control the virus. The optimistic start-up is the first time that we see this is possible in humans.”

    Mothe and her colleagues used an HIV vaccine made by Professor Tomáš Hanke from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom (UK).

    The study included 13 participants, who had taken ARVs for a little over three years on average – all within six months of being infected.

    After four weeks, eight of the patients saw the virus rebound. But the other five patients have gone six to 28 weeks without having to restart the treatment.

    The virus became temporarily undetectable, but it has never gone above 2,000 copies per milliliter, which is the criterion to restart treatment.

     

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  • Donald Trump breaks White House tradition by not holding Eid dinner

     

    The president is the first leader not to host a dinner for nearly two decades after the tradition was started by Bill Clinton and then continued by George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

    Instead, the Republican chose to release a statement wishing ‘warm greetings’ to those celebrating Eid. In a joint statement with the First Lady, Melania, he said: ‘Muslims in the United States joined those around the world during the holy month of Ramadan to focus on acts of faith and charity.#

    ‘Now, as they commemorate Eid with family and friends, they carry on the tradition of helping neighbours and breaking bread with people from all walks of life.’

    The dinners were traditionally attended by prominent members of the Muslim community, members of Congress and diplomats from Muslim countries.
    Secretary of State Rex Tillerson also rejected a request from the State Department’s Office of Religion and Global Affairs to host a reception marking Eid, according to CNN.

    Read more: metro.co.uk

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