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  • South Sudan: 32 kidnapped Ethiopian children recovered

     

    JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — Authorities in South Sudan said they have recovered 32 of the 125 Ethiopian children who the Ethiopian government said were abducted from its Gambela region two weeks ago during a deadly cattle raid blamed on a South Sudanese militia.

    Ogato Chan, acting governor of South Sudan's Boma state which borders Gambela, told Associated Press Saturday that local chiefs collected the children from three villages in Likuangole County where the raiders had dropped them off. Chan said the recovered children will be brought to state capital Pibor then sent to Juba to be repatriated to Ethiopia.

    "The chiefs are looking for the rest of the children," he said.

     Ethiopia's government said 208 people died in the April 15 raid and blamed the attack on an ethnic Murle militia from South Sudan.
     In Ethiopia, Gambela regional president Gatluak Tut told AP he has not been notified about the recovery of the children.

    Deadly cattle raids and abductions of children are common along the border of South Sudan and Ethiopia between the Murle in South Sudan and the Nuer and Anyuak tribes who live in both countries. Children are sometimes kidnapped to look after stolen cows.

     

    Source: AP 

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  • Migrant crisis: 'My wife and my baby drowned in front of me'

     

    The people locked up in the stadium in this picturesque port town have an extraordinary story of tragedy and survival.

    "My wife and my baby drowned in front of me," is the first thing Muaz from Ethiopia tells me, before insisting that at least 500 others died when a badlyovercrowded wooden boat capsized.

    It is often hard to get accurate information from people who have witnessed what must have been a terrifying and chaotic event. But these survivors, who appear to be in their 20s and 30s, are in no doubt about the scale of this disaster.

    "Two-hundred-and-forty of us set off from Libya but then the traffickers made us get on to a bigger wooden boat around 30m in length that already had at least 300 people in it," said Abdul Kadir, a Somali. Also among the survivors are Ethiopians, Sudanese and Egyptians.

     

     

    The already hugely unstable boat then capsized. All this was happening in the middle of the night in the Mediterranean far from shore.

    "I was one of the few who managed to swim back to the smaller boat," Muaz told me as the sounds of Greek children enjoying the sports facilities outside drifted into the well-guarded room.

    A Red Cross worker at the stadium told me that among this group that was rescued were three women and a young child aged just three. The young boy had been taken to hospital as a precaution but was fine. "We have no idea where his parents are but an aunt is with him," she said.

    The survivors were not even sure where they had begun their journey in Libya, but they believed it was the port city of Tobruk.

     

     

    They said the Libyan man in charge of the boat continued the journey across the sea but then the engine broke down. One said it was sabotaged for God knows what reason by the trafficker, who then headed back towards Libya in a small boat that had been tied to the side.

    He had apparently helped them with one desperate call for help before abandoning them.

    "RESCUE 16 April 2016" was painted in red on the roof.

    Later that day a Filipino-flagged cargo ship, Eastern Confidence, heard an alert from the Greek and Italian coast guards.

    Now how would you have expected the 41 survivors to have reacted after such an ordeal when, the following morning, they reached dry land? This may surprise you. They were angry.

     

     

    "The crew of the ship said they were taking us to Italy but instead we ended up here in Greece," a Somali man said.

    "But you survived. You made it," I replied somewhat startled. After weeks of hardship and unimaginable risk, let alone expense, they clearly felt their mission had failed.

    They had even refused to get off the ship as the Eastern Confidence's log from Sunday morning shows.

     

    08:50 Port Authorities start interrogating the refugees

    08:50-09:30 Negotiation… Refugees refused to disembark

    09:30-10:00 Port Authorities seek advice from Ministry of Maritime

    10:00 Additional Hellenic Coast Guard personnel onboard

    10:20 Finally refugees decided to disembarked without force


    "They are going to be deported," a Greek police officer told the BBC.

    "They are not from Syria," he added, implying that they would not qualify for asylum even though in theory they are allowed to apply.

     

    So far no officials from any countries have given out any details of the apparent massive loss of life. That seems inexplicable, but if everything these people have told me is true, the fact that it happened far from land and at night is one possible reason, although not an excuse.

    This apparent tragedy happened exactly a year after the worst recorded incident at sea since the migrant crisis had begun, when 700 migrants were feared to have drowned off Libya.

    It is a haunting coincidence and a reminder of just how desperate people are - not necessarily to escape war but to escape from poverty. As for the traffickers who are making money overloading the boats - are they not mass murderers, too?

    Souece: BBC

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  • Edit Ethiopia's army is trying to rescue 108 women and children abducted in a cross-border raid in the western Gambella region, the government says.

     

    It blamed Friday's raid, in which 208 people died, on the Murle community from neighbouring South Sudan.
    The government said the army had killed 60 of those who carried out the attack.
    The Murle have previously been accused of carrying out cattle raids and stealing children to raise as their own.
    A mother whose husband was killed and three of her children abducted by the attackers told the BBC that she has no hope of seeing her children again.

    A map showing Gambella province in west Ethiopia
    "I don't know if they were killed during the crossfire," Chol Malual said. "The fighting was intense and if they survived, they will be probably be killed by the Murles."
    Meanwhile, additional medical personnel have been sent from the capital Addis Ababa to help treat dozens of people who were injured during the attack.
    "We have treated 82 patients," a medic in the Gambella region told the BBC, "most suffering from bullet wounds to the chest, abdomen or head.
    "We feel insecure here and would like the government to deploy security guards in the more dangerous areas."
    Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn said in an address to the nation on Sunday that Ethiopia was seeking permission to cross the border for a joint military operation with South Sudan.

    Mr Hailemariam said neither South Sudan's army nor rebel forces were involved in Friday's attack.
    The prime minister added that "primitive and destructive forces kill people here at various times by moving from place to place".
    The targets of the raid were members of the Nuer ethnic group who live in both South Sudan and Ethiopia, the AFP news agency reports.

    Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-36071090

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