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Ethiopian News


  • Coffee Chains Prove Addis is Still Thirsty for Brew

    Addis Abeba’s cafe culture stretches across all walks of life. At any time of day, the City’s cafes are teeming with customers who stop in between appointments, or even conduct business over a cup of coffee. Lingering for a morning over a newspaper rented or bought from wandering vendors and speaking to friends is a popular way to spend time for both locals and tourists in Addis.

     

    “I have been a customer from the beginning. The coffee here has a special taste,” says Daniel Gebremaryam, a customer at Abyssinia Coffee. “The space is wider and you can spend a long time over coffee than in other places.”

     

    Abyssinia Coffee began exporting coffee in 1990, and opened a coffee shop in Addis two years ago. So far, it operates in two locations. “We process coffee for the local market, which is sold in our café, after being ground and packaged,” explained Abiy Demise, export Manager. “But we do not get the standard of coffee that we want because the government does not allow the use of export standard coffee locally..”

     

    Lately there has been a boom in the number of coffee shop chains spreading across the city. They include Kaldi’s Cafe, Bilo’s, and Abyssinia Coffee. The majority of these coffee shop chains also sell processed coffee which has been roasted and ground on both the local and international markets.

     

    “The 25 years of experience that we have in the sector will help us to be competitive in the coffee market, which will help generate foreign currency,” says Andamlak Ashenafi, Abyssinia’s coffee sales manager. Even though Abyssinia does not export their coffee, it has found a significant demand on the local market, and amongst tourists in Addis.

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  • Ethiopian candidate for top WHO job gets full backing from Africa

    Ethiopia’s former Foreign Affairs minister Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has received strong backing from African countries to head the World Health Organisation (WHO), whose elections are due next month.

     At the World Health Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland from May 21-31, member states will vote in a new director-general for the UN’s leading health agency, who will take office on July 1.

    Tedros, 51, outlined to The New Times that his five priorities for the organisation namely: universal health coverage; health emergency preparedness; women, children and adolescents; health impacts of climate and environmental change; and creating a transformed WHO that is effectively managed, adequately resourced, results-focused and responsive.

    “I would like my legacy to be the Director-General who brought the world together to achieve universal health coverage that is equitable and affordable for all. I believe that access to health is a human right,” he said.

    “The Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in Africa report that came out last year by WHO and others stated that 11 million Africans are falling into poverty every year due to high out-of pocket payments. That is unacceptable. I am convinced that UHC, with strong primary care and essential financial protection, is the key to overcoming global health security threats and to avoiding impoverishment.”

    If elected, Tedros said he will seek to strengthen coordination and information flows between the Secretariat, the regional offices, including the Regional Office for Africa, and the country offices.

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  • Ethiopian housekeeper in 'murder escape' debunks 'fake' suicide story

    An Ethiopian housekeeper who was filmed begging for help as she hung from the seventh floor of an apartment complex while her Kuwaiti employer stood-by and filmed her, has spoken out about her ordeal and debunked media claims that she had tried to kill herself.

    The domestic worker spoke to Ethiopian media for the first time since a video went viral showing her cling to a window ledge before losing her grip and dropping seven floors, escaping without major injury.

    "I am fine, thank God, I am fine," she said in a video as she lay in a hospital bed after the fall, suffering from a broken arm and bleeding from her ear and nose.

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  • Donkey slaughter house opens in Bishoftu

    Ethiopia is to export donkey's meat, following the start of operations at a slaughterhouse in Bishoftu (Debrezeit) town, 48Km east of Addis Abeba. Shandong Dong, a donkey slaughterhouse, has just opened after 80 million Birr, according to media reports.

    The company will export the meat to Vietnam and the skins of the donkeys to China, which will be used to manufacture medicines.
    The factory was torched down by protesters in Bishoftu/Debre Zeit town a few months ago.

    Another donkey abattoir is being constructed by Chinese investors in Assela, Arsi, Oromo region of Ethiopia, the newspaper added.
    China has turned its face to Africa for its donkey demand, which is attributed to the increased demand of donkey’s in China, especially for its skin, according to media reports.

    In Niger, some 80,000 donkeys have been exported to China in 2016, compared with 27,000 in 2015. In Burkina Faso, donkey traders sold 18,000 animals to international buyers in the first quarter of 2016, up from just 1,000 for the same period last year.

    In Kenya, a donkey abattoir opened in April last year in Naivasha to cater for the burgeoning Chinese market.

    But this thriving export market is not without considerable drawbacks for local people. In Niger, the price of donkeys has risen from 34 to 147 USD, a huge rise for farmers and merchants who need to buy donkeys to maintain their livelihoods. Officials are also worried that the demand for exports will decimate local donkey populations. In response, the government has banned donkey exports.

    Burkina Faso implemented similar regulations last year. In Ouagadougou, the situation was reportedly discussed twice in cabinet meetings before ban on donkey’s meat was announced.

    In South Africa, meanwhile, the surge in demand has led to a rise in cruelty towards, and theft of, donkeys. In a statement released this month the National Council of Societies for the Protection of Animals (NSPCA) said it was “horrified to confirm that donkeys are the latest victims of the trade in animal parts ‘for medicinal purposes’ to the far east. Donkeys are being rounded up, stolen, then transported and brutally slaughtered for their skins.”

     

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